Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Darius by Grace Burrow Release Day

Today, I want to Welcome Grace Burrowes to our little blog! We are celebrating the release of Darius! Following suit with her many novels, the hottie on the cover pulls you in, but her fantastic writing keeps you there! Learn about this great new release, and stay tuned to the end for one fantastic Giveaway! 


Though there are lines he will not cross, Darius Lindsey has become the favored plaything of bored, titled society ladies. He contracts one final engagement with the pretty, sweet, Lady Vivian Longstreet, hoping that meeting his obligations to Vivian will free him from the financial constraints making his life hell. Darius finds instead that the bargain he thought would cost him the last of his self-respect instead resurrects both his honor and his heart.





Excerpt


Darius pushed aside pity—burying two sons merited pity—and focused on practicalities, something he was good at. “So you seek somebody not only to bed your lady, but also to get her with child? If so, then I am assuredly not your man.”
“That would be part of the bargain.” Longstreet’s voice did not betray a hint of shame about this proposition. “Hear my reasons before you make an old man face that bitter wind.”
A lady’s honor was to be compromised, but an old man was to be spared the nippy weather. This was what Darius’s life had come to.
“Make your words count, my lord. While I am sensible of the dilemma you face, surely there must be cousins or nephews somewhere who can solve the problem by inheritance and spare your lady this unseemly contrivance you contemplate.”
“There are none. If I die without legitimate male issue, then the entire estate reverts to the Crown.”
Spare me from titled old men and their petty conceits. “This has happened in many a family, and you will be dead, so what does it matter to you?”
Longstreet shifted again in his chair, though Darius suspected that was a seasoned parliamentarian’s delaying tactic.
“Were it simply a question of my needs, young man, you’d be absolutely right. However, upon close examination, I find the Crown could make a credible argument that there is virtually no personal estate. My wealth is significant, but the Crown’s lawyers will twist matters such that none of that wealth is personal, but rather, all attached to the title. The regent would get everything, and Vivian would be literally a charity case.”
“Your wife has no dower portion?”
“None worth the name. I am pained on her behalf to be so honest, but ours was not a romantic match. She needed marrying rather desperately, and I could not abide to see her taken advantage of by those who prey on women in such circumstances. I suppose I needed a bit of marrying too.”
Darius sipped his drink, angling for time to absorb his guest’s words. Usually, a woman desperately in need of marrying had conceived a child desperately in need of legitimacy. Lady Longstreet’s difficulty was the absence of children.

Meet Grace:

I am the sixth out of seven children and was raised in the rural surrounds of central Pennsylvania. Early in life I spent a lot of time reading romance novels and riding a chubby buckskin gelding named—unimaginatively if eponymously—Buck. I also spent a lot of time practicing the piano. My first career was as a technical writer and editor, a busy profession that nonetheless left enough time to read many, many romance novels.
It also left time to grab a law degree through an evening program, produce Beloved Offspring (only one, but she is a lion), and eventually move to the lovely Maryland countryside.
While reading yet still more romance novels (there is a trend here) I opened my own law practice, acquired a master’s degree in Conflict Management (I had a teenage daughter by then) and started thinking about writing.... romance novels. This aim was realized when Beloved Offspring struck out into the Big World a few years ago. (“Mom, why doesn’t anybody tell you being a grown-up is hard?”)
I eventually got up the courage to start pitching manuscripts to agents and editors. The query letter that resulted in “the call” started out: “I am the buffoon in the bar at the RWA retreat who could not keep her heroines straight, could not look you in the eye, and could not stop blushing—and if that doesn’t narrow down the possibilities, your job is even harder than I thought.” (The dear lady bought the book anyway.)


When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?


There was never a moment of realization. I started keeping a journal before I could write cursive, and the habit of writing (and journaling) has never left.


How long did it take you to write your book?



The answer to that question is not as simple as you’d think. I can finish a rough draft in about six or seven weeks. This does not mean I write eight books a year, because that rough draft has to sit for a few weeks, and then I take it out for a first polishing. Most of my drafts need several polishings, and they all need incubation time between iterations. It’s probably more accurate to say that to generate a submittable draft, I need at least several months.


What genre is your book? What made you choose to write in that category?

“Darius” is a Regency historical romance, and I started writing there because I’ve read thousands of them.

What was your work schedule like when you were writing?

My works schedule? I’m a child welfare attorney, so there’s that schedule, but early mornings, evenings, weekends, snow days, holidays, etc., I’m at my computer and happy to be there.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

ARGH. I never read my published books? On the one hand, I don’t have time, but on the other, I’m afraid all I’ll see is what’s wrong, and not what’s right.

Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

The ideas come from all over--period sources, my life, the news, books I did not like (so I write something more satisfying to me), but to come up with these ideas, my life needs mental white space. I’m most likely to come up with a viable book idea when I’m driving a familiar route, walking a familiar road, and I otherwise have the deflector shields down.

My favorite place to get period-specific information is original sources--diaries, letters, news paper articles. Biographies are also a lot of fun, particularly if they have a good bibliography.

How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

I’ve written thirty some novels, and of those... twenty-five are under contract, “Darius” is the ninth full length novel to hit the shelves.


Are you currently working on another book? 
If so, is it part of a series or something different?

I’m ALWAYS working on another book. If it isn’t galleys and copy edits, it’s my Work In Progress. I’m halfway through a book that’s the third story in a Regency trilogy about soldiers coming home from the Peninsular campaign, each of whom has been held captive in some regard--by a garrison, a belief, or an obligation.

What do you like to do when you're not writing?

READ! And there’s so much good stuff out there to read these days, it’s hard to choose.

What does your family think of your writing?

When I became published, they were not surprised, while I was--still am.

What was one of the most surprising things you learned about yourself in creating your books?

The dots are still connecting. By that I mean, I thought I’d closed the book on my musical aspirations thirty years ago and not looked back, then I ended up writing a lovely book, (“The Virtuoso”), about a talented pianist who could longer spend his life at the keyboard. For thirty years, my musical experience went dormant, but when I needed it for a book, it was at my fingertips. Fun!

Do you have any suggestions to help others become a better writer? If so, what are they?

WRITE more than you aspire to write. Do not be bamboozled by the people who are always foghorning about their work in progress and to whom they’ve pitched, and how many words they added to their manuscript in the last fifteen minutes. While they’re foghorning, and pitching, and word counting, you WRITE.

Do you hear from your readers much? What kinds of things do they say?

I do hear from readers, and it’s an unlooked for perk of publication. A few times, I’ve been chided for not squashing a villain like a bug, but mostly, readers let me know they’re enjoying the books.

What do you think makes a good story?

A good romance is a complicated undertaking. It needs the character arc of a tragedy, the happy ending of a comedy, the lovely prose of literary fiction, the external conflict of a mystery, and the pacing of a thriller--all times two, if you can pull it off.

As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

Be married to a handsome farmer and raise twelve kids. I recall that dream clearly, and should probably be grateful to have been spared it. Farming is hard enough, but twelve kids?!



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125 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. It's lovely to get to know you better Grace!! Fantastic interview! I think the most interesting thing is that you wanted to be a farmer and raise 12 kids LOL! So random and yet so awesome :)

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    1. I was happy when I was on my godparents' farm, with my horse, working hard and playing harder, and yet, I know farming is difficult, dangerous, thankless work. Writing happily ever afters is MUCH easier.

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  3. You had me hooked before I finshed the synopsis. I am so reading this book. I find it interesting that Grace doesn't read her finshed books. I look forward to this read.

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    1. I'm a-scared to, Angee! I started reading "The Heir," and found that somebody was standing near Fairly's brother, when they should have been standing near his brothel. Slammed the book closed and got back to writing the next one.

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  4. I read one book written by Grace and love it!

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    1. oops, I forgot to add this: She can finish a rough draft in about six or seven weeks. You must feel drained after that!

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    2. Nicole, this is another one that isn't so light-hearted, though it has some moments. I think you'll enjoy the May release, "Nicholas" as happier read. And yes, I feel drained after I finish a book, and ready to start another one.

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  5. Oh, Grace, I can so picture you as a farmer with twelve kids and still writing fantastic books! Loved the whole post, getting to know Darius and you better and the cover is yummy!

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    1. Carolyn, thanks for stopping by. I personally think that would be a more appealing cover if Himself wore a cowboy hat.

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  6. Wow! You wanted twelve kids? Anyway, great interview and I can't wait to read Darius. Congrats

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    1. I am one of seven, and I would have liked a few more. A fate would have it, I have one daughter, and she was more than a handful sometimes.

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  7. It was most interesting to hear you talk about using your musical training in a book. I think that our life experiences are never wasted and I love it when our life brings us back around to another time. Haven't gotten to reading Darius yet, but the excerpt was quite a motivation!

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    1. The music creeps in, Kellianne, like when I wrote Lady Sophie's Christmas Wish, and Handel's "Messiah" kept slipping onto the pages... uninvited.

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  8. I really enjoyed the part in the interview where you discuss your recommendations on helping others become better writers. Thank you for the advice! ~Great blog and AWESOME giveaway~ Thanks for the opportunity to win!!!

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    1. Tara, I got so intimidated at my first writer's conference. I'm pretty sure nobody meant to rattle my confidence, but they all sounded so knowledgeable, and then I'd find out that person with the word count spread sheet had never finished a manuscript. The one who had the agents and editors in a e-rolodex in her phone had finished exactly one... writers write. You'd think I'd know that.

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  9. I love, love, love Grace Burrowes' books. Julia Quinn recommended The Heir not long after it was first released and I was hooked immediately! I wasn't aware she was a child welfare attorney, just knew she practiced law, and admire her all the more for improving the lives of children. I know from reading another interview or bio that she also doesn't own a TV! That would most definitely give her time to write, but there are some shows which I think she most definitely would enjoy (Downton Abbey, of course!!). Can't wait to read the books she's written that I have yet to read due to my wandering interest in genres. I bounce around between genres and right now am in a spin through contemporary. But GB's books are the first historical books I'll be reading in order to catch up!

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    1. Candice, you might enjoy Carolyn Jewel's books. She's the only author I know of who does a bang-up paranormal series (demons and mages, VERY steamy), and first rate Regencies too (also steamy, and with some of the most beautiful covers I've seen).

      I'm a hardback-the-day-it-comes-out JR Ward fan too.

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  10. Grace, I have already bought your book. Amazon PROMISES it will be here today. Since I read your FB page and website religiously I agree that marrying a farmer and having 12 children is the newest thing that I've learned about you. I can't wait for your other books that I've pre-ordered. Martha

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    1. And I'd sit on the porch swing with a bunch of kids (we'd need two facing each other) with my husband in the opposite swing with a bunch more kids, reading books and telling stories as the lightning bugs came out, and the crickets sang... as if farmer EVER has time to sit still....

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  11. 12 children, a job and has time to write

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    1. MaryAlice, I wanted twelve kids, but ended up with one--and a job and lots of time to write. I suppose in a sense I have hundreds of kids, because my work gives me that privilege.

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  12. It's wonderful, that Grace thinks the same about what makes a great story, as me! :D Sooo cool! ♥


    xoxo

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  13. Oh wow! Sounds like a book I can get into!!!

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    1. THAT's the reaction I want, Lagina, though I'm pretty sure this premise isn't for everybody, particularly among Regency readers.

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  14. ove all your books Grace and have everyone published and have down loaded all the others i can. You as you probably know are my favourite Regency writer .
    As a beta reader for you I appreciate you taking notice of some of the comments i make about your book , I happen to be reading for you !
    Please carry on writing your wonderful books. I am looking forward to later on today when i settle down with Darius

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    1. Jayne, there are some ways in which you can say, "I saw him first," and you'd be telling the absolute truth. How you have time to raise your children, keep up with the job, read voraciously, and still look over a manuscript for me boggles the mind. And that memory of yours! Never met anybody who could recall detail the way you do.

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  15. That Grace has written 30 novels..Love the cover of your book..Thanks for this great Giveaway! Tina M

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    1. Teena, 30 manuscripts. That's like saying I've stacked up thirty lumps of clay. They have a long, long way to go before they're turned into elegant vases, pretty cups, and sturdy bowls.

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  16. I find it inspirational that you hold down what I can only assume is a very demanding full time career and still have time to write all those books. I guess I kind of always assume (wrong thought it usually is) that ALL writers do only that. Kind of hard to imagine after reading so many books that the authors don't continually live in their own writing worlds with all those fabulous characters they create. Thanks to you all!

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    1. Crystal, I need something to come home to beside a night on the hampster wheel, fretting over how I might have made my closing argument more convincing, or worrying about the foster kid who is now a runaway. For years, reading provided the relief, and now I turn to the writing, which works even better (which might be a HINT).

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  17. How dedicated and awesome sshe is w her writing career. <3

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    1. Jodi, I just love to write, and waiting until later in life to get going on it has meant I want to make hay while the sun shines. Lots of hay.

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  18. The most interesting for me was the musical piece. Funny how you can stop doing something but just like riding a bike, you never forget.

    Another that I liked was the writing in journals as a kid. My daughter did that quite a bit, starting in elementary. She'd write a story but would never finish it. I would find stories in all of the notebooks she had at home and the ones she took to school. Sadly, she does not do it as much as a teenager.

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    1. Sarah, another activity that went into storage was horsebackriding. It was my greatest joy up through adolescence, and then, well, not JUST boys, but largely boys turned my head. As I approached forty, the lawyer work began to really grind on me, the kid was giving me fits, and I developed some health problems. I thought to myself, "When was the last time I was abundantly HAPPY?"

      That was when I was a kid on a horse. I started taking lessons again, and the ponies got me through some very, very tough years. My daughter too.

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    2. Sounds like you have lots in common with my 14 year old. She play drums, would love to live out in the country (I'm a city girl myself). Enjoys reading and writing and she so badly wants to learn to ride a horse so she can learn barrel racing. Unfortunately, soccer takes up most of our time but it's all good.

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  19. You dont read your published books? WHAT? LOL...well, glad so many of us do. I love you Grace....your writing, your amazing sharing of all your tools and your grace.

    Thanks...Darius is up for tonight....looks like I dont get much sleep but such a nice way to lose it!

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  20. Grace, did I mention I think we were probably sisters in a past life? I love and look forward to reading your soldiers' stories. I'm in the middle of The Virtuoso from the library right now, because my copy was graciously autographed by you and it has a place of honor in my antique bookcase. I'm just so proud of all you've accomplished and thank you for putting your experiences in your work. Yeah, you don't read your published books? I understand completely. I would feel the same frustration. Thanks, again!

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    1. Julee J, that is high praise, and I value my sisters dearly. Something about those first three Windham boosk--Heir, Soldier, and Virtuoso--was the making of me as a writer. They speak to the lawyer, the musician and the horsegirl in me that will always be a part of me.

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  21. The most interesting is that you had aspired to marry a farmer and raise 12 children! You have been one of my favorite authors since I picked up that first "Grace Burrowes book". So I am very glad that you didn't stick to your original goal! I am expecting my copy of Darius to arrive today or tomorrow....and looking forward to reading it!! Sincere best wishes for a wonderful release of Darius!!

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    1. Farmers are heroes to me. They have to be prodigiously hard working and smart about everything from animal husbandry to agronomy to power mechanics, meteorology, business planning, accounting, veterinary science, soil science, parasitology, time management... they are the most amazing people, and some of the best storytellers...

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  22. I find anyone brave enough to want to raise 12 children fascinating.
    Love your books, Grace! I have everyone of your books and am looking forward to Darius too.

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    1. I find anyone who raises any kids and makes a proper job of it fascinating. And then there are the people who have no children of their own, but find ways to love children anyway...

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  23. So looking forward to this one! Love books with a twist. Just finished rereading Maggie's story this morning and what I would love to see a glimpse of at some point in the future, is exactly how they explained Bridgit to people outside the family. Very much enjoying all these books and looking forward to many more.

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    1. Cathy, I will think on that, but there's plenty of precedent for by-blows being raised in a titled household. The Duke of Devonshire had a rather famous "blended family" that included a menage with his wife and her best friend and a bunch of his/hers/hers/maybe hers too offspring. The Victorians have skewed our view of Regency mores in the direction of propriety, I'm thinking. A wealthy Regency fellow might have by-blows, and that was no disgrace. If he failed to provide for them, THAT was a disgrace (and well it should be).

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  24. Hi Grace. When I was growing up my desire was to become a wife and a stay at home mom, much to my regret I didn't get that wish. Later I wanted to be either a history teacher or librarian but wound up with an AAS in Library Technology and a work career in the food service field.

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    1. Grace I just ordered Darius along with two other books from Amazon and they're due Thursday. I think I need to lay off the computer and my Kindle go back to reading actual books or I'm going to be buried under my TBR stack. Am so looking forward to meeting you next year at the RWA conference literacy meet and greet. I'm not going to be all that unhappy if I don't meet any other authors as I'll stand in line as long as needed to meet you.

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    2. Molly, we might have to plan breakfast or something rather than that crowd scene... I'm not an e-reader myself, not yet.

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  25. I've read all of Grace's books and can't wait to dig into this one!

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    1. THAT is what an author loves to hear. There's a blog tour posted on my website under the events section, and I'll be giving away copies at almost every stop.

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  26. Did reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder books have anything to do with the dream of marrying a farmer and having a baker's set of kids?
    30 Completed manuscripts means many happy reads & rereads in my future - Wohoo!
    Kitchen Witch aka Larisa

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    1. KWW, I never could get into the Little House books. I grew up in Central PA, which is very agricultural, and my dad taught in the Penn State College of Agriculture. I was born loving horses, and my godparents made it possible for me to spend many weekends and summers on their farm. Hard, hard work, but wonderful memories.

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  27. I loved the advice on writing.. I'm always worried that I'm not writing enough a day (or every other day x.X) and it's nice to know that's maybe it's okay to take time and not rush through it (Cuanam wolfspirit - howlofwolves@yahoo.com)

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    1. Cuanam, every author's path is different, and the only way to figure out your own path is to write a few books and watch for when the writing goes most easily. Anybody who starts talking about writing in terms of must, should, always, and other commandments is somebody to take with a large grain of salt. Do what works for you, and even if that's writing daily, you're probably going to need a rest, some variety, and the occasional frolic and detour.

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  28. I find it really interesting that you don't read your published work. I wouldn't want to read mine either, I would only see the mistakes. 12 kids, wow. Great interview!

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    1. The mistakes, the woulda, coulda, shoulda's... except I got my ARC's yesterday for my second Scottish Victorian, and I LOVE that book. I confess I did read the first scene... and part of the second.

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  29. Wow, I am always impressed by people who continue to further themselves as the years go by. A Masters Degree, a law practice, writing and still maintaining a family. I am tired just thinking about it! lol It has been a pleasure to meet you Grace. I haven't read any of your books yet, but I am looking forward to it! Thanks! :-)

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    1. Kris, I think the high school diploma is the most meaningful academic achievement. It takes 13 years of full time work, you can't chose most of what you study, when you study it, or with whom; you can't save the hard stuff for the end; you can't take a semester off because the only available teacher isn't a good match for you. In the time it takes a kid to get that diploma, and adult can be earning a college degree, a master's and a PhD with a few years off to recharge.

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  30. As I have loved everything of Grace's so far, I am sure I will love Darius as well. I hope she continues to provide us with excellent reading material for a very long time! Happy Release Day, Grace! You will always find a place in my TBR pile, probably near the top!

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    1. Kylan, there will be a book a month coming out for the next year, God willin' and the creek don't rise.

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  31. Great interview! 12 kids is very ambitious lol. The book looks great.

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    1. I've only known one family with twelve kids--they took up a whole pew in church, but how did they all GET to church?

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  32. I love that your family wasn't surprised that you were published, but you were! It shows how important family and their support is! They always believe in you, even while you're not so sure!

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    1. Adrienne, it also shows that my family had not the clue about what it takes to get published in genre fiction these days through traditional channels. And yes, they do love me, even the ones who will not be caught dead holding one of my books.

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  33. I'm so excited you have so many books on contract. I have all of the published ones including Darius that arrived on my kindle overnight. I loved the stories of their Graces. Dare I hope for a story of how little Rose came about?

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    1. Linda, you dare hope. Douglas and Guinevere's story is scheduled for the end of this year or early next. Because it's the Windham prequel, I'm hopeful that it will come out in mass market paperback as well as ebook, but that decision hasn't been made yet.

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  34. Loved reading about her wish to have 12 kids... Mine was to have 6, I stopped at 2!
    Also love that she is a Reader!!

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    1. Katrina, I got hold of the Wolf and the Dove when I was in 7th grade and pretty much have been reading romance ever since. When my publisher's staff starts haranguing me about what the readers want, I often want to laugh. I was reading romance before they were BORN, fer cryin' inna bucket.

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  35. Well, what do you know? We are both from Central PA!! Great country for dreaming! No wonder you are such a great writer! There's so much inspiration there to draw from too. I love your books. Have you ever thought of doing historicals set in that area?

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    1. I'm from Centre County, and the spelling is a function of the area being settled by the French. You don't hear much about French settlements, so yeah, I think that might be a fun place to do some writing. Maybe refugees from the Terror, a few handsome Englishmen lurking in the undergrowth... hmmm

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  36. I can't wait to read this book!! Wow she really wants 12 kids? I live about 15 mins from PA, that is so cool. I live in Keyser, WV

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    1. Now Keyser is cool. Isn't Dolly Sods the only tundra in the Lower Forty Eight, the only place below the Mason Dixon where they've recorded snow every month of the year? I think THAT would make a good setting for something Hitchcock-ish, with snow in July and Bigfoot loose in the hills... Let me know if you're ever headed over to Hagerstown. We have a Starbucks of which we're quite proud (note the singular).

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    2. I should be going to Hagerstown soon as I love the outlets & it is getting about time to buy summer clothes. LOL I love Starbucks I wish there was one closer that I could go to everyday lol

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  37. Being raised on a farm sounds like a different sorta life.
    Being a city girl myself, I can agree on the number of children. I have three adults children now, boy that was hard enough.

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    1. Fewer and fewer people are raised on farms, and it's a profession you almost have to learn from little up. How to build am electric fence or a lambing pen, how to drive a tractor, stack a hay wagon, what to do with a ewe who's labor isn't going well, when to rotate which crops... endless expertise.

      Maybe kinda like being a parent?

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  38. 12 kids??? I'm at 3 and almost bald from pulling out my hair lol. Can't wait to read the book, I love that it's the man who has to "work" for the money.

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    1. And oddly enough, in those days, prostitution itself was not illegal, NOT that my boy goes quite that far. Soliciting was illegal (go fig), and living off immoral commerce was illegal, but the occasional profitable outing... tolerated by the law, if not by society.

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  39. Grace, I really enjoyed this interview! I am in awe that you are able to juggle work as a child welfare attorney with a writing career. I was happily surprised to hear that you had 25 books under contract, as I always look forward to your new ones.

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    1. Amy, the balance of the Lonely Lords will be issued as ebook/print on demand trade paperback rather than ebook/mass market paperback, at least at first. The remainder of the Scottish Victorians will be ebook/mass market, and I'm REALLY enjoying those.

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  40. Grace, I find it interesting that you said you need "white space" in order to generate ideas. I have found that doing organizing or cleaning (which I'm sorry to say I seldom find myself wanting to do) or otherwise doing something repetitive sometimes brings about creative brainstorming. Glad to hear Darius is out today. Will download onto e-reader. It doesn't take long to get used to e-readers. To anyone who has hefted books back and forth in moves, it will come as a delight that you can store 100's of books without worrying about space or moving them around. I still have my keepers from several years ago - but I have started downloading a few of them for re-reads. J.R.Ward is one; Loretta Chase is another. Sherrilynn Kenyon. And all of yours except the first three as they were purchased in print. :) Mary @reedmwordy@aol.com

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    1. MANY authors have told me they get ideas when doing dishes or folding clothes. For me, it's walking the dog on the same old country lanes, or driving the same old routes. The best ideas need a relaxed mind to welcome them.

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  41. From a farmer's daughter to a Would-have-been farmer's wife. :-) You were so right, Grace, to avoid the farmer's wife scenario. It IS a hard life, although rewarding for many. The thought of 12 children boggles my mind...I thought two was plenty! I love your writing, Grace, and will continue to buy and read your books. Darius will be no different. I purchased it...but have not yet read it. Today I finished doing our taxes...yea! Continue your good wordsmithing...reading is my staycation and relaxation. My salvation, really. jdh2690@gmail.com

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    1. Janice, through many years of single momming, and more years of being a lawyer in an area of practice that often feels lose/lose, reading was my salvation and often still is. 'Bout cried when I heard Sherry Thomas was writing YA. How could she leave us like that?!

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  42. Lovely interview, Grace. But 12 kids? Wow. I guess in your day job you got your 12 kids though, and lucky kids they are to have you.

    Marcy Shuler
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. Oh, I was full of grand ideas as youngster. My godmother looked so fine driving that tractor...

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  43. Lovely interview, Grace. I always wanted between 3-4 children, but got one, and he's wonderful. I already have Darius, and a Kindle Fire does me no good down here. So I just stopped by to say hello and tweet.

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    1. Thanks, Ella. I only have one child myself, but she has opened my mind to universes I would never have visited otherwise. I would not be the writer I am had I not be graced with that child.

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  44. 12 kids? Oh, my! I don't have any kids of my own, but I joke that, as a teacher, I have more kids than I know what to do with.

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    1. Amen, sista. And your summers last about seventeen minutes compared to everybody else's. Magic, that.

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  45. great seems like a great person with a big heart.

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  46. Replies
    1. Um, Vickie, I wanted to be a farmer's WIFE. Bit different. While Himself was out getting a ferocious sunburn and heaving haybales around in the 95 degree heat, I'd be home putting up peaches. Peaches weigh LOTS less than haybales. I know this.

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  47. Great interview, Grace! Darius was delivered to my kindle at 12:01 am this morning, and I read until 4pm. Just finished it! Stong, involved relationships, complex characters and exploring the social mores of the time. I loved it! Thanks for all you do!

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    1. Barbara, thank you. There were male prostitutes, and even brothels that catered to ladies who wanted the company of their own gender. It think the Victorians got out one big can of white wash, and tried to cover the entire Regency with it. A Scottish fellow trying to tote up all the professions in London in 1806 estimated that one in ten women were engaged in prostitution... in the 18th century, the estimate was as high as one in five. Strikes me it was probably a common way to make ends meet, heaven help them.

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  48. The most interesting fact I learned is that Grace feels the dots are still connecting.

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    1. Looooong may they connect, in the books and in my life.

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  49. Her books sounds like a read I would really enjoy...(she has 9 published) and this is the first I've heard of her?!?

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    1. Kitten, yeah, it probably is the first you've heard of me, because I haven't been around long. My first book came out in December 2010, which in publisher time is "recently." I figure most authors can expect to pay dues for at least five years, and if I'm lucky, I'll still be publishing good stories twenty years from now.

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  50. What an awesome interview and interested in reading her book as well.

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  51. That she was raised in Pennsylvania :) close to my neck of the woods!!

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  52. Wanting 12 kids...has to be a dream that very few aspire to!!

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  53. Great interview! I love that Grace wanted to marry a farmer and have 12 kids - being raised in a farming community, I know how hard that life is and I ran away from it as fast and as far as I could *grin*

    I can't wait to read this book. Thank you for bringing her to my attention!

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  54. The most interesting part of this interview, for me, was Grace's answer to "What do you think makes a good story?". It was kool learning what it took for her to create her awesome stories.

    skyla11377(At)AOL(Dot)Com

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  55. Honestly I am IMPRESSED that you managed to get a law degree through night school. Congrats!

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  56. Love all of your books Grace. Can't wait for more. I love the family dynamic in your books, it is easy to tell your from a big family. The most interesting part for me was that we are both FARM girls.

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  57. welcome to the family cant wait to read your books ..

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  58. What a great interview! The most interesting thing I learned was that Grace was raised in central Pennsylvania (Centre County). I lived in Bellefonte (Centre County) for a number of years. Also writing 30 books is amazing. Are they all historical romances?

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  59. I'm utterly amazed that you wanted 12 kids. One seemed to be enough for me... :)

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  60. That she wanted to have so many kids! That's awesome!!
    Ashley A

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  61. First, thank you Grace! this book sounds awesome, cant wait to read it! ok, i am just starting to write my first story. hearing that you don't need to try keeping up with everyone else out there is a HUGE help! Thank you for the Giveaway!

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  62. I have to admit that the fact that you wanted 12 kids definitely grabbed my attention and as I scrolled down, it grabbed quite a few others! HEEEEHEEE

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  63. I am going to add Darius to my huge pile of books to be read. Thank you for the opportunity to win a Kindle Fire

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  64. You wanted 12 kids?!? I can't even imagine! That's nuts. Way to catch a break!

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  65. The most interesting fact I learned about Grace in this interview was that books she did not like, give her inspiration (eg writing something more satisfying.)
    Great interview, nice to meet you Grace!!

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  66. Great interview!

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  67. Oh my gosh, twelve kids?!?!? I guess some things just work out for the best!

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  68. thank you for the Article.
    Marilyn (ewatvess@yahoo.com)

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  69. It's interesting she started keeping a journal before she could write cursive.

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  70. Thanks for the great advise about writing! I am currently writing my first book and I always feel guilty when I dont get to write everyday.

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  71. That she raised 12 kids. Holy cow! I couldn;t do it.

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  72. I thought it was interesting that she wanted to have 12 kids. That's a lot of kids LOL She wouldn't get as much writing done if she had that many.

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  73. Great interview! 12 kids though? LMAO. *poor vagina lol*

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